Sticks-a-GoGo Art Cloth meets ZigZagDesigns

What started as a casual meeting during a presentation Christine was giving at Canada College Fashion Department, has become a friendship.  A friendship which recently blossomed into a  professional collaboration.  Christine Groom of ZigZag Designs and me, Mary Lou Fall of sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth are collaborating at Artistry in Fashion on September 28, 2019 from 10-4 pm at Canada College located in Redwood City, California.

I am so excited to share one of our collaborations.

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ZigZag Designs Loretta Jacket and sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth Trees_1

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The Loretta Jacket is a pre-order and can be found at @zigzagdesignsbychristine and http://www.etsy.com/shop/ZigZagPatterns and the art cloth can be purchased at Artistry in Fashion or ordered through https://spoonflower.com/profiles/sticks-a-gogo_art_cloth

 

 

The Many Images of Art Cloth

Creating digital textile images via contemporary digital printing technology empowers me to make my own art cloth designs.   Looking through the lens of my cellphone along with a gentle click of the finger, I am able to create a narrative of places, people and things I find interesting.

The ability to bring my vision to “life” from start to finish elevates my importance as a designer and a consumer. Utilizing new skills, which by the way, I’ve been taking classes using Photoshop Elements, supports my desire to create something special, a timeless unique piece of artwork.   A symbiotic relationship develops between me and the image, I am emotionally attached to the cloth because it describes who I am.

©Mary Lou Fall 2019   Cranberries and Lemon Zest
©Mary Lou Fall 2019    Shapes and Lines
©Mary Lou Fall 2019   Sunflower and A Bee

To view more of my work visit https://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/sticks-a-gogo_art_cloth

 

 

 

 

 

Sticks-a-GoGo Art Cloth

For a long time, I’ve wanted to combine two of my passions…photography and fabric.  I’ve been fascinated with Photoshop for some time, and recently discovered a vehicle for designing fabric digitally, Spoonflower.

I started out with a picture I captured with my digital camera.

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Melissa’s Origami©  Photography: Mary Lou Fall

Used Photoshop for fun, and uploaded my design to Spoonflower.

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I proofed the design to make sure the visual imagery was what I wanted.

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I’m excited about all the creative possibilities for this fabric design with more to come.  Stay tuned!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Textiles

While checking my Facebook feed today, I noticed Messy Nessy Chic posted some beautiful photographs taken by photographer/artist Christoper Payne http://www.messynessychic.com/2016/01/13/unexpected-beauty-hiding-inside-americas-last-fabric-factories/   which capture several mills that still operate in the United States.

“In this era of service jobs and office work, most of us have never been inside a factory. Several decades of overseas competition, unequal trade policies, and a flood of cheap imports have decimated American factories. Since 1990, job losses in apparel and textiles have been greater than those in any other type of manufacturing, and today we have little idea where, or how, the shirt on our back is made.

In 2010, I discovered an old yarn mill in Maine that reminded me of the state hospital workshops I had photographed for my book, Asylum. While those places had long been abandoned, this mill was fully operational, a scene from the past miraculously coexisting with the present. I returned to the mill several times, and from conversations with employees, learned of other mills in the Northeast, many still functioning as they had for decades, using vintage equipment now prized for producing the “genuine article”.

In 2013, I toured several mills in the Carolinas, where the majority of textile production eventually migrated from New England, because the labor was cheaper. The mills are vast and mostly automated, and have survived by adapting technologically to the global marketplace. Though they bear little resemblance to their Northern forbearers, they are bound by a common history and are economically dependent on each other. By the time a finished fabric reaches the customer, it has passed through many factories, each a crucial link in the chain of production.

Over the past five years, I have gained access to an industry that continues to thrive, albeit on a much smaller scale, and for the most part, out of public view. With my photographs I aim to show how this iconic symbol of American manufacturing has changed and what its future may hold. I also wish to pay tribute to the undervalued segment of Americans who work in this sector. They are a cross section of young and old, skilled and unskilled, recent immigrants, and veteran employees, some of whom have spent their entire lives in a single factory. Together, they share a quiet pride and dignity, and are proof that manual labor and craftsmanship still have value in today’s economy.”

Here is one of my favorite photographs taken by Christopher Payne. http://www.chrispaynephoto.com/textiles1/3t84aycz3g450y0o6wyk7txxp907mb

Made in USA: Textiles
Leavers Lace, West Greenwich, RI

Intro To Block Painting/Printing

Today, before I venture out to do my inner core workout, I want to share my latest endeavor, “Block Painting.”  I’ve wanted to experiment with this technique for awhile, and decided to go for it!  Initially, the blocks were purchased to use with polymer clay, but after watching numerous YouTube videos, I decided to use fabric.  I also plan on using the eclectic mix of paint in my collection, before investing in the medium.

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Here are various blocks for borders, allover printing, etc.

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Remnants of a quilting project.

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I drew a grid on the fabric first for placement of the block.  Of course, the striped fabric may or may not be your choice, but I wanted to try it anyway.

Got to go to class…more to come.

Ikat

My favorite fabric store in Berkeley, CA, Stonemountain and Daughter posted an interesting idea about sewing with Ikat fabric   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ikat.

Ikat

I’ll be trekking up to the East Bay next week and can’t wait to stop by and check it out! Perhaps you’ll find the post interesting.   http://fabriclady3.blogspot.com/

Ikat #2

If At First You Don’t Succeed

try try again. My journey back into sewing all started with an unsuccessful trip to the mall. The mass produced garments hanging on the racks, sewn out of low quality fabric, and lacking style and fit did not deserve a visit to the fitting room.  I briskly walked to my car and could not wait to arrive home because tucked away in several storage bins in my attic were options, Swiss cotton, Italian cotton, wool and silk.

It just so happened a pattern drafting Skirts class being offered at Eddie’s Quilting Bee fit my schedule. Skirts The Beginning_1

By implementing Sally-Ann’s instructions in conjunction with Nicole Smith’s, Skirt-A-Day Sewing, I drafted a skirt foundation block using my low hip measurement. Upon the completion of the skirt block, I drafted a two-dart sloper.  At this point, Sally-Ann mentioned, “Sometimes in takes three to eight muslin to reach the final draft.”  My first draft needed alteration.  After taking 2″ off the waist and 1/4″ off below the low hip, I drafted a second sloper.  The second muslin side seams pointed out that my hips tilt forward.  Sigh..Back to the drawing board.  I drafted 3/4″ off the back and added it to the front.  The third muslin did not hang even.  I have one hip higher than the other.  I proceeded to cut and pivot the front by inserting 1/2″ at the low hip measurement, and inserting  1/4″ to the back.  The fourth muslin back did not require any further alterations, but I needed to pivot the front by inserting an additional 1/2″ for a total of 1″.  The fifth muslin front and fourth muslin back are perfect… ten drafts later.  The final copy of the final sloper needs to be mounted on poster board with spray adhesive.  On to the next phase, A-Line Skirt.

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Skirts #3Skirts #2