Poncho Mondrianesque

Here’s my latest knitted garment for body adornment using Binary Stitch #4. For this knitted item, I looked to the works of Piet Mondrian and the aesthetics of Minimalism for inspiration.

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Piet Mondrian NY MoMA

The definition of Minimalist art of the 1960s described as seriality, succession, progression, repetition permutation also applies to my concept, knitting with Binary Stitches.  Encoding letters as binary numbers creates an original design using knit and purl stitches.  Knitting the assigned  knit and purl stitches builds a basic block, and through repetition, forms a sculptural grid-like appearance.

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Even though each knitted rectangular plane is separated by a black line, the plane itself is not contained on all four sides by a black line..  Each plane is knitted without an exact pattern repeat producing an asymmetrical balance.

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Poncho Mondrianesque 2016©

Poncho Mondrianesque is a one-piece rectangle.

Yarn: (5 colors) Plymouth Yarn Arequipa Worsted 218 yds 90% Superwash Merino, 10% Mulberry Silk.  I’ve also incorporated various yarn from my stash.

Size 6 US circular needle

Stitch Pattern: (8-stitch pattern repeat)

Row 1:  P2,K1,P2,K1,P2

Row 2: (All even rows) Knit as stitches present themselves

Row 3:  K2 P4, K2

Row 5:  P1, K1, P1, K2, P1, K1, P1

Row 7:  K3, P2, K3

Row 9:  P3, K2, P3

Row 10:  Repeat Row 2

These ten rows create the stitch pattern.

Gauge:

24 sts = 4.25″ = 5.64 sts = 1″

5.64 sts x 18″ wide = 101.5 sts

Notes:

  1.  In keeping with the stitch pattern, CO 96 sts + 2 edge stitches
  2. For edge stitches: (RS)  Wyif, slip the first and last stitch purlwise.  (WS) Knit tbl of first stitch and knit the last stitch.
  3. Begin and end with 6 rows of K1, P1 ribbing.
  4. Separation of rectangular planes knit with color black in reverse stockinette stitch.

CO 98 stitches and knit in pattern for 48-52 inches.  For a more form fitting poncho, I knit to 43 inches.

How To Assemble:

Fold one end of rectangle (A) over and seam to one edge (B) on the opposite side of the rectangle.

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Poncho Mondrianesque ©

 

 

 

©2016 Mary Lou Fall

 

 

My Studio Space

It’s been a few days since my last post, but for the last nine months, in between my sewing and knitting projects, I’ve been  involved in a DIY project.  I decided to  convert our spare bedroom into my studio space.  I pulled up old carpet, filled plaster cracks, sanded molding and painted.  The floors also needed to be professionally refinished.

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It’s amazing what a fresh coat of paint and determination can accomplish.

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Newly refinished floors.

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My Studio

Deciding to convert our spare bedroom was not an easy decision, but after being vacant for five years, I decided it was time to create a space for me.  A positive enriching environment filled with my favorite things…yarn, books, fabric and ideas.

Tile Bracelet

Every once in awhile, I put down my knitting needles and pick-up a block of polymer clay. A dear friend of mine, Debbie Anderson, teaches interesting classes using the medium. Debbie and I, about 21 years ago, were two of the founding members of the South Bay Polymer Clay Guild in San Jose, California.

Here are a few photos highlighting the tile bracelet technique:

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Both sides of a fabric strip were treated with fabric stiffener, and left to dry for a couple of days.
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Once a channel for elastic cord was constructed and a backing sheet of polymer clay was applied, the tiles were cut apart and liquid polymer was applied to the fabric surface of the tile.
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After the tiles were processed in the oven, gloss was added to the surface of each tile.
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The tiles were strung with seed beads and a hand sculpted toggle using polymer clay.
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Texture was added to the back of the tiles using an unmounted rubber stamp.
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Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

Yesterday, while revisiting familiar territory, I began to reflect on my various artistic experiences with polymer clay and my own artistic growth.