Stitches Wednesday #4

This week is my favorite Binary Stitches© pattern by far.  The reversibility of all the Binary Stitches© makes this a very interesting journey.  Many times, I’ve wanted to knit a particular stitch pattern to find out the “wrong side” is just that.  Recently, a fellow knitter shared with me her experience knitting a shawl with slip stitches that didn’t look so great on the wrong side.  So here is #4…

Stitches Wednesday #4
Binary Stitches #4©
Stitches Wednesday #4A
Binary Stitches #4©

Here’s a current project using this week’s featured stitch.  The particular yarn I am using, Plymouth Yarn, Arequipa worsted 90% Superwash Merino and 10% Mulberry Silk highlights the stitch definition beautifully.

Stitches Wednesday #4B
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

I’m not quite sure where I’m going with this…buttons, vintage trim or maybe even a zipper.

Stitches Wednesday #4D
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

Binary Stitches #4©

Row 1: *P2, K1, P2, K1, P2, *repeat across row.

Row 2:  All even rounds, knit stitches as they present themselves.

Row 3:  *K2, P4, K2

Row 5: *P1, K1, P1, K2, P1, K1, P1, *repeat across row.

Row 7: *K3, P2, K3, *repeat across row.

Row 9:  *P3, K2, P3, *repeat across row.

©2016 Mary Lou Fall

Stitches Wednesday #3

I decided to convert this week’s stitch pattern from flat to circular. I hiked to my local library in search of Margaret Radcliffe’s, Circular Knitting Workshop, which focuses on essential techniques to master knitting in the round.

I’ve always known the gauge swatch for circular knitting should be done circularly, but I avoided doing it. So, I decided to experiment with an open-backed swatch on double-pointed needles while carrying the yarn across the back – the same technique for knitting i-cord.

Stitches Wednesday #3A

It just so happens my gauge was slightly looser compared to knitting the same stitch pattern flat.

Stitches Wednesday #3B.jpg

 

Binary Stitches #3©

The following directions are for flat knitting:

8-st repeat

Row 1:  *K3, P1, K3, P1, *repeat across the row.

Row 2:  All even numbered rows, knit stitches as they present themselves.

Row 3:  *K1, P2, K2, P2, K1, *repeat across the row.

Row 4:  Repeat Row 2

Row 5:  *P1, K2, P2, K2, P1, *repeat across the row.

Row 6:  Repeat Row 2

Row 7:  *P8, *repeat across the row.

Row 8:  Repeat Row 2

Row 9:  *P3, K2, P3, *repeat across the row.

Row 10:  Repeat Row 2

End of pattern

Neck Adornment #1

Materials:  US Size #7 circular needle, Yarn: Schoppel Gradient 100% Virgin wool, 260 m, qty (2).

Circular Gauge: 4.5 sts = 1″ 4 rounds = 1″

Circumference: 44″    Width:  15″

Stitiches Wednesday #3
Binary Stitches© – Neck Adornment #1

CO 217 sts (extra stitch included) join in the round.

Cast on one extra stitch.  To join, slip one stitch purlwise from the right needle to the left needle.  Holding the cast-on tail together with the working yarn, knit 2 together which will join the first and last stitches of the cast on, place marker.  When you come to the first stitch at the beginning of the next round, knit the 2 strands together.

Circurlar (converted flat pattern above)

Rnd 1:  *K3, P1, K3, P1, *repeat across the row.

Rnd 2:  *K1, P3, K1, P3,

Rnd 3:  *K1, P2, K2, P2, K1

Rnd 4:  *P1, K2, P2, K2, P1

Rnd 5:  Repeat Rnd 4

Rnd 6:  Repeat Rnd 3

Rnd 7:  P8

Rnd 8:  Repeat Rnd 7

Rnd 9:  P3, K2, P3

Rnd 10:  K3, P2, K3

End of pattern.  Continue repeating until desired width is reached.

CO 217 sts (extra stitch included) join in the round.

Cast on one extra stitch.  To join, slip one stitch purlwise from the right needle to the left needle.  Holding the cast-on tail together with the working yarn, knit 2 together which will join the first and last stitches of the cast on, place marker.  When you come to the first stitch at the beginning of the next round, knit the 2 strands together.

©2016 Mary Lou Fall

 

Stitches Wednesday #2

Before I show you the second gauge swatch in a series of Binary Stitches©, here is an example using Stitch #1.

Stitches Wednesday #2D
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

I found the perfect yarn for the perfect project…Zealana Rimu.  Fingering Weight Rimu is a machine washable brushtail possum blend. Using this unique yarn also helps make New Zealand’s ecosystem a lot healthier.  The brushtail possum invades the nest of New Zealand’s kiwi, which face habitat destruction by these unwanted non-native species.

Edge Stitches:  Chain stitch: (RS) Slip the first and last stitch purl wise with the yarn in front. (WS) Knit through the back loop of the first stitch and knit the last stitch.

Scarf

CO 38 stitches using a Size 5 US needle.

Rows 1-12:  Work twisted ribbing (k1 tbl, p1) for approximately 2 inches.

Using the Binary Stitch© #1, work (5) repeats of pattern.

Work twisted ribbing for (6) rows for approximately 1 inch.  Continue working stitch pattern  (5) times separated by ( 6) rows of twisted ribbing.

Knit until desired length.

Stitches Wednesday #2_1
Binary Stitches© #2

Stitch #2 depicts squares within a square.  I wonder what this would look like using slip-stitch knitting?  Knit at least three pattern repeats to fully see the pattern.

10 stitch pattern repeat

CO 30 using a smooth worsted-weight yarn and Size 7 US Needles.

Row 1:  K2, P1, K4, P1, K2

Row 2 and all even rows:  Knit the stitches as they present themselves.

Row 3:  K1, P2, K1, P2, K1, P2, K1

Row 5:  P2, K1, P4, K1, P2

Row 7:  K2, P2, K2, P2, K2

Row 9:  P2, K6, P2

Row 10: End of pattern

©2016 Mary Lou Fall

 

Binary Stitches

Since I live in Silicon Valley, why not design with Binary Stitches©.  What are Binary Stitches©? Knit and purl stitches defined as bit or bytes offer a multitude of ‘new’ knitting stitches, which I refer to as Binary Stitches©.

Each week on my blog I’ll  introduce a new pattern swatch.  So, here is the first example of many more yet to be discovered.

binary stitches #2A_1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

The above-pictured swatch has not been blocked because I did not want to flatten the texture of the surface.

Binary Stitch Pattern #1©

The swatch is knit with a smooth worsted-weight yarn using  US Size 7 needles.  Knit the stitch pattern at least three times through to fully enjoy  the stitch pattern.

18 st pattern repeat

CO 36 sts

Row 1:  K2, P3, K3, P2, K3, P3, P2

All even rows:  Knit the stitches as they present themselves.

Row 3:  K1, P1, K2, P1, K2, P1, K2, P1, K2, K1, K2, P1, K1

Row 5:  P1, K7, P2, K7, P1

Row 7: P2, K1, P1, K2, P6, K2, P1, K1, P2

Row 9:  K2, P4, K1, P1, K2, P1, K1, P4, K2

Row 10: End with this row.

Copyright © 2016 by Mary Lou Fall

 

 

Letting Go

Finally, the heat has subsided and temperatures are back to normal for this time of year.  I decided to take my needles and yarn outside for a change of scenery.

California Dreamin'_1
Photo credit:  Mary Lou Fall

I was greeted by three bromeliad pups.  The plant basically gets ignored, but always seems to provide us with such beauty every year.  I decided to organize my knitting space within eyesight of nature’s gift.

During a recent visit to Avenue Yarns on Solano Avenue in Albany situated not far from Berkeley, I decided to finally embrace short-rows.  Just by coincidence, a pattern I was also checking out on Ravelry was recommended I try, Breathing Space, designed by Veera Valimaki. “The sweater is worked from top-down with a raglan yoke and the asymmetric shaping makes it very stylish and at the same time very easy to wear.”

California Dreamin' #2_1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

After starting and restarting a few times, I finally figured out short-rows with the help of Purl Bee’s online tutorial   http://www.purlsoho.com/create/2008/06/18/short-rows/.  The main color I selected for Breathing Space  from MJ Yarns, Simple Sock Fingering Weight, 75% Superwash Corriedale/25% Nylon, Col. Fresh Mowed, and the yarn for striping Wollelfe M/S Gradient 400 Fading to Grey, 65% Merino extra fine, 35% Silk.  I did gauge swatch the yarns and found Simple Sock Fingering did shrink a little.  The pattern is written with clear concise directions, and definitely exercises the brain cells.

Just by changing my “breathing space”situating myself in an environment of beauty and calm, in a different space and time, I  was able to reflect on one line in the pattern description that resonates with me in a very personal way, “The art of breathing, something we rarely really pay attention to, is so much like letting go.”

 

 

Knitting With Beads

Last summer, I explored surface design with polymer clay by experimenting with metallic dye and paint.  This summer, I cracked the cover of Betsy Hershberg’s book, Betsy Beads published by XRX Books in 2012. Sometimes, when I get so excited about a new project, I jump in feet first. Even though I know how to knit I-cord, I convinced myself to start from the beginning of the book with the first I-cord tutorial.

Knitting With Beads_1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

Beginning at the top slipping beads according to the directions: A) Knit five rounds, purl 1 round. B) Knit one round, purl one round. C) Same as B.

Betsy’s first and straightforward project, KISS: Keep It Simple Spiral happened by happenstance.  “A Zen moment – recognizing that what you are looking for can often be found only when you stop looking.”

IMG_20160729_152816
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

The shorter green necklace highlights KISS: Keep It Simple Spiral.  The blue lariat necklace knit with sock-weight merino and 700 glass seed beads follows the all-over bead-knit tube technique, finished using the Zipper Technique for joining the cast-on to the bind-off edge.

Knitting With Beads #3
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

Here are two more examples of the KISS: Keep It Simple Spiral knit with bamboo and Japanese seed beads.

20160802_152821-1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

The above Dorset button beaded bracelet is knit with tulle and glass seed beads using  5 rounds, purl 1 round I-cord.  Also, the button was embellished with beads.

I also experienced my “Zen moment,” Approaching a known technique, which  I’ve worked with, as if I were doing it from scratch gave me the opportunity to look at it from a different perspective.