Sticks-a-GoGo Art Cloth Welcomes The Bokeh Collection

Here at sticks-a-gog0 Art Cloth, I am pleased to introduce the collaboration between our current collection with the Bokeh Collection. These two collections work together creating an aesthetically pleasing art form. An art form viewed on fabric for the discerning sewist/designer.

©Mary Lou Fall The Bokeh Collection: Trees

©Mary Lou Fall The Bokeh Collection: Trees with Streets of Prague

©Mary Lou Fall The Bokeh Collection: Trees and Here and There

Along with the new collection, I am excited to be a part of the Shutterfly/Spoonflower collaboration.

Bokeh Collection

In short, Boke is a Japanese photographic technique that produces an aesthetic quality of blurring. “In 1997, the English spelling bokeh was popularized under the direction of Mike Johnston of Photo Techniques Magazine.” Wikipedia

I am excited to introduce the Bokeh Collection to the line of sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth.

©Mary Lou Fall 2021- Bokeh Collection: Here and There

©Mary Lou Fall 2021 – Bokeh Collection: Sunflower

©Mary Lou Fall 2021 – Bokeh Collection: Golden Leaves

View my Bokeh Collection http://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/sticks-a-gogo_art_cloth

Fashion Plate Designs

What began as printing cellphone images on fabric, has developed into my own clothing line. I am thrilled to use fabric from the sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth collection in conjunction with garment design.

The first in the collection is a T-shaped coat featuring sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth Frosty Morning, Vintage Landscape and Ornaments On A Tree.

©Mary Lou Fall 2021

©Mary Lou Fall 2021

©Mary Lou Fall 2021

The neck and front facing are in process. The other pictures provide a closer look at the Art Cloth, and the stages of development.

Visit my shop at http://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/sticks-a-gogo_art_cloth to view more of my work.

Natural Landscape

A few years ago, I discovered the positive effects of hiking. On those many outings, I would carry my cellphone and chronicle the flora and fauna in my own backyard, so to speak. I wanted to share the images with others, so I started posting to Instagram.

After positive comments regarding my images, what was my next step? How could I reach a broader audience? Just by coincidence, I overheard a conversation about print-on-demand for fabric. This could be a perfect vehicle for sharing the natural landscape of my local park trail with others. Did I mention, I also consider sewing one of my passions?

Sample Proofs of sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth Trees2

©Mary Lou Fall 2019

I decided a jacket designed by Wiksten provided the perfect canvas for my Art Cloth.

©Fabric designed by Mary Lou Fall 2019

Viewing The World Through A Different Lens

In previous blog posts, I’ve mentioned using the lens of my cellphone camera to record my narrative in images absent of words. My visual diary is not hidden in a book locked with a key, its present for all to see.

My story is told to a wider audience through surface design on fabric. For me, it’s gratifying to share my talent to the world looking for an informed collective that appreciates my talent .

After researching various resources for print on demand, I selected Spoonflower for this endeavor. I’ve participated in design competitions with Spoonflower, but have not won, yet! My designs do not look like everyone else’s, and it’s a good thing because my visual diary stands apart from the rest. I like being unique…

©Mary Lou Fall 2021 – sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth Adornments

©Mary Lou Fall 2021 – sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth Daffodils and Pansies

“In order to be irreplaceable one must always be different.” – Coco Chanel

Some of This

My special place for creativity consists of books, yarn and fabric. I don’t favor one over the other because color, texture, and print are wonderful companions for me and each other.

Recently, I finished knitting a Long Cardigan designed by Jane Yu found in Noro Magazine Issue 15. Noro’s bouclé yarn, Kanzashi, creates a bouclé fabric reminiscent of the Chanel Jacket. Bouclé yarn is an uneven yarn of three plies one of which forms loops at intervals. Hence, French meaning “to curl.”

My long cardigan compliments the Cher Knit Dress by Style Arc Patterns. I’ve recently discovered Style Arc Patterns from Australia.

“Some things never go out of fashion. Jeans, the white shirt and the Chanel jacket.” – Karl Lagerfeld

Surface Design

Here at sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth studio, the new year brought on a flurry of activity.  Many new ideas, opportunities and abundance of possibilities expand the focus of our creative space.

Sunflower on a Telephone Line, is the first Art Cloth design of 2021 entered into a competition with Spoonflower.  The competition is for licensing the design for Spoonflower packaging.

©Mary Lou Fall 2021

I am fascinated with the art of Vincent Van Gogh and his Sunflowers.

Painting by Vincent Van Gogh

“The sunflower is mine, in a way.” – Vincent Van Gogh

 

A Photograph

Mobile Photography is the future of the art form.  Discrete intimate and always accessible to capture a moment. –  David S. McNamara

Photographs are said to preserve a moment in time, chronicle a piece of history, and refer to the ephemeral.  Does the act of photo manipulation rewrite the history documented in the original photograph? I don’t use photos as a memory aid, but as a way to manipulate color, patterns and shape.  I decided to co-mingle technology with textiles producing sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth.

For the last two years, I’ve produced images for surface design on fabric.  Below are two examples, showing the original image and the resulting surface element.

  ©2020 Mary Lou Fall

  ©2020 Mary Lou Fall – Topography

©2020 Mary Lou Fall

©2020 Mary Lou Fall – Rose On A Fence

 

New Year, New Designs

What a way to start the New Year…New Designs featuring sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth.

Frosty Morning
Frosty Morning ©Mary Lou Fall 2020

Art Nouveau Feathers
Art Noveau Feathers ©Mary Lou Fall 2020

Landscape
Landscape ©Mary Lou Fall 2020

 

Looking for Something

Over and over, I keep asking myself the same question, “What am I good at?”   Of course, this question does not refer to me as a person, but as an artist.  I’m an accomplished knitter publishing  free patterns on Ravelry.  Out of necessity, I learned how to sew my first garment when I was eight years old, and currently I’m enrolled in the Fashion Program at Canada College located in Redwood City, California.  Later in life, I studied Art History at the University of California, Berkeley.  Fulfilling a life-long dream, and being the first in my family to graduate from college was bittersweet.  But, “What am I good at?”

As a young girl, I enjoyed taking pictures with my father’s Kodak Instamatic Camera with plastic flash cubes.  When my father started using the Polaroid Camera with the peel-apart color prints, I was hooked.  I carried a Polaroid Pocket Camera everywhere I went.  A few years back, I began experimenting with Holga plastic cameras.  The journey which began with “red eyes,” instant color prints along with the double-exposure capability using 120 film, prepared me for the boundless creative options of the cellphone camera.

How could I take advantage of the beautiful art images I captured with my cellphone camera?  In a world with digital prints on fabric, why not put my images on fabric?  Better yet, why not sew with fabric which created a digital narrative of what I “see” as interesting.

IMG_6227
sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth Trees 1

IMG_6220
sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth Trees 1

These photos were sent to me by Virginia.  Along with sticks-a-gogo Art Cloth, Virginia used the Yuya Dress pattern by Damar Studio.  It is so gratifying to see my digital narrative take on a new meaning.

I began this post with a question, and I’ve found the answer.  For a view of my digital textile images, visit http://spoonflower.com/profiles/sticks-a-gogo_art_cloth

 

 

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