Mokume Gane Inlay

My self-directed studies of surface design on polymer clay has opened up an array of options.  I’ve always wanted to apply oil/acrylic on canvas, but realize I lack an innate talent for drawing.  With polymer clay as a canvas, investigating the use of different mixed-media techniques satisfies my desire to paint.

Blog post, On The Grid, dated July 7, discusses applying texture and paint to the surface of a Mokume Gane enhanced  sheet of black clay.

Off The Grid_1

I looked at the piece for a week trying to decide what to do with it.

Mokume Gane Inlay #2_1

On The Grid

Today’s polymer clay post explores surface design.  In previous posts, I’ve discussed the ability to make impressions on a layered block of polymer clay using a variety of tools and rubber stamps.  The imprinted layers of a  block of clay is an attempt to adapt Mokume Gane or “wood grain metal” a Japanese metalworking technique.

Yesterday, I had a discussion with Andrea Chebeleu,  the owner of A Work of Heart about the experimentation process vs. producing an end product.  I believe, it’s necessary to gather a wide variety of process driven experiences, in order to develop a subconscious database of knowledge. Taking Myself To Camp (blog posts 1, 2 and 3), did just that. My plans were to adopt and adapt the various surface design techniques to polymer clay.

On The Grid #2

Instead of imprinting the polymer clay with tools or rubber stamps, I manipulated the clay replicating wood grain.  Sliced portions were applied to a conditioned piece of clay.

Off The Grid_1

After using a texture sheet, Lumiere metallic acrylic and opaque acrylic paints an interesting textural surface appeared.  After the paint dries, something amazing will happen.