On The Grid

Today’s polymer clay post explores surface design.  In previous posts, I’ve discussed the ability to make impressions on a layered block of polymer clay using a variety of tools and rubber stamps.  The imprinted layers of a  block of clay is an attempt to adapt Mokume Gane or “wood grain metal” a Japanese metalworking technique.

Yesterday, I had a discussion with Andrea Chebeleu,  the owner of A Work of Heart about the experimentation process vs. producing an end product.  I believe, it’s necessary to gather a wide variety of process driven experiences, in order to develop a subconscious database of knowledge. Taking Myself To Camp (blog posts 1, 2 and 3), did just that. My plans were to adopt and adapt the various surface design techniques to polymer clay.

On The Grid #2

Instead of imprinting the polymer clay with tools or rubber stamps, I manipulated the clay replicating wood grain.  Sliced portions were applied to a conditioned piece of clay.

Off The Grid_1

After using a texture sheet, Lumiere metallic acrylic and opaque acrylic paints an interesting textural surface appeared.  After the paint dries, something amazing will happen.

Acrylic and Canvas

Today, I went to a book signing event at A Work of Heart Studio ttp://www.aworkofheart.com/in San Jose, CA.  Mixed media artist/author Roxanne Padgett of Acrylic Techniques in Mixed Media, discussed the techniques explored on various samples.  By playing with various techniques and materials, “your own personal style will emerge.”   Roxanne encouraged all of us to “fear no color.”

Here is my first attempt at layering and stenciling with acrylic on canvas:

Acrylic TechniquesAcrylic and Canvas

After the layering, I outlined a variety of shapes using a colored sharpie marker and a gold metallic pen.

Acrylic and Canvas #2

As I turned the sample, I noticed different shapes and patterns emerge.

Acrylic and Canvas #3

This was so much fun!