Knitting With Beads

Last summer, I explored surface design with polymer clay by experimenting with metallic dye and paint.  This summer, I cracked the cover of Betsy Hershberg’s book, Betsy Beads published by XRX Books in 2012. Sometimes, when I get so excited about a new project, I jump in feet first. Even though I know how to knit I-cord, I convinced myself to start from the beginning of the book with the first I-cord tutorial.

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Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

Beginning at the top slipping beads according to the directions: A) Knit five rounds, purl 1 round. B) Knit one round, purl one round. C) Same as B.

Betsy’s first and straightforward project, KISS: Keep It Simple Spiral happened by happenstance.  “A Zen moment – recognizing that what you are looking for can often be found only when you stop looking.”

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Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

The shorter green necklace highlights KISS: Keep It Simple Spiral.  The blue lariat necklace knit with sock-weight merino and 700 glass seed beads follows the all-over bead-knit tube technique, finished using the Zipper Technique for joining the cast-on to the bind-off edge.

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Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

Here are two more examples of the KISS: Keep It Simple Spiral knit with bamboo and Japanese seed beads.

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Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

The above Dorset button beaded bracelet is knit with tulle and glass seed beads using  5 rounds, purl 1 round I-cord.  Also, the button was embellished with beads.

I also experienced my “Zen moment,” Approaching a known technique, which  I’ve worked with, as if I were doing it from scratch gave me the opportunity to look at it from a different perspective.

 

 

 

Knitting With Beads

I’ve been asked to be a guest at one of our local knitting groups in Los Gatos, CA.  Our attention will focus on knitting with beads.  While sifting through the stacks at my local library, I  discovered a wonderful resource entitled, “Knit One Bead Too,” expertly written by Judith Durant.  The visual instructions are well-documented and the written instructions are understandable.  “The “Knitter’s Palette,” a workbook of color, explained by Kate Haxell offers an interesting section on adding color with beads, pgs. 60-61.  Last, but definitely not least, “Betsy Beads,” confessions of a left-brained knitter, Betsy Hershberg.  A book full of inspiration which pushes the limits of knitting with beads.

Here are a couple of samples I’m working on for the class on Thursday.

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