Step By Step

Sometimes, the best adventures are those not planned.  On the spur of the moment, my husband and I decided to take a day trip to Point Reyes National Seashore.

Point Reyes June 2016_1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

The main attraction for the day was the Point Reyes Lighthouse.

Point Reyes June 2016 #4_1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

After evaluating the path down to the lighthouse, my husband decided to wait for me at the top.  So, I began the journey step by step.  Along the way, I captured beautiful photographs. Here’s one of them.

IMG_5409
Photo credit:  Mary Lou Fall

I successfully reached the lighthouse, and began the journey back to the top.  On my way up to the top, I noticed each step was numbered.  There are 308 steps down and 308 up.

Point Reyes June 2016 #5_1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

It was sheer determination that motivated me to walk down to the lighthouse.  For the last five years, I’ve realized how determined I am.  Specifically when it comes to learning something new with challenges.  Take for instance, I attempted to knit a pattern with short rows twice. I’ve decided to try the pattern again.  Perhaps the third time’s the charm.

Silke designed by Julie Weisenberger of Coco Knits “is a drapey, flattering tunic with front points that hang down lower than the back” in a slip stitch pattern.  With this attempt, I decided to knit and block the swatch due to the linen content in the yarn.

Step By Step 2016_1_1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

The damp swatch was pinned vertically  to test the effects of gravity  on the gauge. This makes sense to me because the garment hangs vertically when worn.

Step By Step 2016 #2_1_1
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall

I’ve cast on 226 stitches using a Size 7 needle in  Schoppel Leinen Los 70% wool, 30% linen, Col. 7653M.  The tunic/cardigan is knitted from the bottom up in one piece.

Step By Step 2016 #4
Photo credit: Mary Lou Fall (Rocks collected from Drake’s Bay, Point Reyes National Seashore)

I need to work straight until piece measures 9″ from the CO edge, and then the cardigan fronts are worked independently. I am determined to knit this pattern step by step.

 

 

Got Gauge?

“Save time by carefully checking your gauge.”  Famous last words for anyone that knits or crochets.  Knitting a gauge swatch indicates the tightness or looseness of the knitter’s tension by measuring the stitches and rows per inch over atleast a 4″ swatch.  Getting correct gauge determines the finished size of the stitched item and insures time wisely spent.  How is gauge checked for items knit in the round?

I’ve posed this question to many in my knitting circle and received a variety of responses. “It doesn’t matter, just knit a swatch.”  “If you’re knitting in the round, swatch in the round.” Why not knit a swatch using two double-point needles creating an I-cord?  (Check-out  www.knitty.com Winter 04 Issue Knit by Numbers).  Got Gauge

I decided to knit three swatches to find out what the difference in gauge would be with each method.  The I-cord method, knitting back and forth on straight needles, and in the round using circular needles.  Each swatch was knit atleast 5″ wide with a worsted weight yarn in stockinette stitch on Size 7 bamboo needles.

The stitches were cut up the back on the I-cord swatch to lay flat. Got Gauge #3Got Gauge #2Compared to the other two swatches, the tension on the knit back and forth swatch was looser.  Before measuring, each swatch was washed.

Got Gauge #4

I-Cord Swatch:  19 sts = 4″ = 4.75 sts = 1″       6.5 rows = 1″

Knitted Flat Swatch:  17.5 sts = 4″ = 4.375 sts = 1″       6.375 rows = 1″

In The Round Swatch:  18 sts = 4″ = 4.5 sts = 1″        6.85 rows = 1

So, I have the answer…each method produces a different gauge.  I believe the I-cord method and knitting in the round are more reliable because both methods mimic knitting in the round.  Of course, each knitter knits differently and your results will be unique to you.