Chameleon Chevrons

My eye is attracted to Early Geometric Period ornamentation.  The basic elements of the dot, the straight line and the angled line are the elements of this style.  The angled line motif makes up the zigzag, which is my favorite motif.  The regularity of the chevron/zigzag ornamental design produces a repeat I find appealing.

According to Bernhard Schweitzer,

The Geometric style is without doubt entirely a pottery style, as it has come down to us.  But a series of phenomena suggest that it developed alongside a lost textile art and that this may even have been the origin of Geometric art before 900 BC.”

(Geometric Greek Art, Bernhard Schweitzer, published  as Die geometrische Kunst Griechenlands, 1969.  Translation 1971 by Phaidon Press Limited p. 30)

Wow! A “lost textile art” and a pottery style developing side-by-side may have been the origin of Geometric art before 900 BC.  Perhaps pots were decorated with ornamental motifs adopted from textiles and adapted for the structure of the vessel.

After completing the Zick Zack Scarf designed by Christy Hamm http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/zickzack-scarf  I’ve been curious about the effects of combining a zigzag/chevron stitch and self-patterning sock yarn. I began with a collection of five different colors labeling them A-E.  I knit a specific number of rows per color.

Chameleon Chevrons #6

After seven repeats of the pattern, I reversed the order of the five colors which changed the assigned row repeat too.

Chameleon Chevrons #4

I eliminated three colors, and knit alternating every two rows.

Chameleon Chevrons #3_1

I’m pleased with the exploration so far.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About 1marylou

I enjoy the process of pushing the world of fiber to its limits with the use of knitting needles and various methods of experimentation. Along the way, the lens of my camera captures what I see.
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4 Responses to Chameleon Chevrons

  1. 1marylou says:

    Thank you for your comment. Soon, I’m posting something interesting about chevrons.

    Like

  2. 1marylou says:

    Actually, weaving played a large part in the development of ornamentation. The checkerboard, saw-tooth and lozenge patterns seem to be developed from weaving techniques. I love the rhythm of repetition.

    Like

  3. KerryCan says:

    This looks like a fun experiment. I love the simple lines and shapes, too. As a weaver, I feel like I could spend my life just doing twill variations!

    Like

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